Tag-Archive for » Brussels apartments «

Delightful Day trips To Take On Your Visit To Brussels

Brussels is superbly located for quick-trips to several charming cities in Belgium. The three day-trips in this article have been highlighted because of their proximity to Europes capital.A little over half an hour by train from the very heart of Brussels is the busy city of Antwerp. If you have a longer stay in Brussels, youll want to experience a day here to enjoy its interesting fashion shops and nice mix of good value restaurants. If you fancy a stay overnight then the abundance of good, clean hotels will be a welcome sight particularly as they charge significantly less than youll pay in Brussels. You can book a hotel from the tourist office in the town centre of Grote Markt.- After checking out Grote Markt amble over to the Onze Lieve Vrouwekathedraal one of the most impressive medieval churches to be found anywhere in Belgium, Onze Lieve Vrouwekathedraal dates back to the 15th century.- Quite similar to Brussels, there are no shortage of restaurants and cafes in Antwerp however it is significantly cheaper to eat.Bruges is slightly farther away from Brussels than Antwerp, but still conveniently placed for a day-trip. It takes about an hour to reach Bruges by train and its well worth the effort when you consider the beauty this well preserved medieval city has to offer. Because of this, Bruges can often be packed in peak season and it can be difficult to obtain accommodation so be sure to book a place in advance if you plan to spend the night. Being a tourist hotspot, eating out in Bruges can be somewhat more expensive than other places in Belgium, and the food tends to cater to the mass number of tourists that flood the city during peak times.- Make sure you take a romantic boat ride along the cities beautiful canals. You can get a ticket for under six Euros.- Bruges offers a choice of worthwhile museums such as Groeninge (displaying a fine collection of Flemish art from as early as the 14th century). The Gruuthuse Museum is another that museum lovers will enjoy set amidst a grand medieval mansion Gruuthuse offers an exquisite collection of art & tapestry.- Onze Lieve Vrouwekerk took over two hundred years to build and this sprawling church of our lady dates back to the thirteenth century.- The Markt is one of the two central squares of Bruges city centre an open market has been held here as long ago as the tenth century.GhentHere are the must-see sights in Ghent if you happen to come for a short stay:- It took approximately six hudred years to complete St Baafskathedraal Ghents most prolific and oldest Cathedral and some parts of this gothic masterpiece stretch back to the twelfth century.- Gravensteen Castle was constructed in the eleventh century and its one of the most prolific landmarks of Ghent. Closeby are the Museum voor Sierkunst en Vormgeving (with various displays depicting Ghent life over the past couple of centuries) and the fish market (Vishmarkt). There are alternative museums to visit Museum voor Schone Kunsten has a large display of art dating back to the 14th century while the Bijlolemuseum is held in a building that was first built in the 13th century.- Stroll along the river Leie for one of the most pleasant walks available anywhere in Belgium.- If youre planning on staying the night you should be able to find a room that meets your requirements. Accommodation is typically fairly easy to secure (except for July when the town hosts Gentse Feesten). Its possible to secure a basic room from as little as 25 euros or if youre able to afford something more extravagant you could kip in style for 400 euros.

If your stay in Brussels extends to a week or more, you should certainly consider a day-trip to at least one of these wonderful Belgian cities.

The best dog breeds for lazy people

The best dog breeds for lazy people are dogs that don’t exist. Dogs require as much love, attention, training, care and grooming an owner can afford to give them. If a person is truly lazy, then owning a dog is not in their or the dog’s best interests. However, if by “lazy,” we mean “couch potato,” then there are a few small dog breeds that are naturally easy to maintain and exhibit low energy levels in an indoor environment that may fit the bill.


According to the web site, Go Pets America (www.gopetsamerica.com), there is a short list of dog breeds that are non-shedders, are small in size and have relatively low activity requirements indoors. Extensive outdoor exercise or long walks are not necessarily required as long as the dog receives adequate indoor exercise and maintains a healthy weight. Some toy breeds may have high energy levels, but can get the exercise they need running around in compact, indoor areas such as apartments or town homes. Some of these non-shedding, small, low activity dog breeds are:

1) Affenpinscher

2) Bichon Frise

3) Bolognese

4) Brussels Griffon

5) Chinese Crested

6) Coton de Tulear

7) Havanese

8) Shih Tzu

9) Toy Poodle

Keep in mind that any dog left to their own devices will become destructive. Providing plenty of chew toys and playthings to keep the dog busy throughout the day will curb his desire to take out his frustrations on your new couch.

Small dogs, especially toy and terrier breeds, are known to be yippers, expressing themselves loudly and continuously at the slightest provocation. Although the concept of training may conflict with a leisurely lifestyle, some early instruction in this area should keep the behavior to a minimum.

Crate confinement can be utilized to redirect energy and prevent damage to belongings when the dog is left by himself. A crate is simply an artificial den made of Fiberglas or wire that can located in any room. Choose a crate that allows the dog to easily enter, turn around and exit without difficulty. Once he learns that this is his special place, he will seek it out to nap or just relax. The crate can also be used as a “time out” location if the dog has misbehaved or needs to be kept isolated from small children or other animals for a short period.

Small, non-shedding, low-activity dog breeds make good pets for many people, regardless of their particular laziness factor. A clear benefit to those of the lazy persuasion may find that owning a dog will slowly draw them out of their couch potato existence and find that they enjoy the simple pleasures associated with dog ownership. Training, exercising and playing with their dog may become more rewarding as the relationship develops, which is what owning a dog is really all about.

Hotel horror stories

My hotel horror story takes place in Brussels. I am an over planner. I am always so careful about my choices. I do a lot of research. Which just goes to show that even with the best intentions and plans, things can still go astray.

I am going to leave the hotel unnamed to protect, well it isn’t to protect the innocent thats for sure but lets just say this hotel is a grand dame in Brussels. As we walked into the lobby we had no idea that anything might be wrong. it is absolutely gorgeous a belle epoch beauty.

As we were checking in I heard the woman who was checking us in ask the other man who was helping us in French “it is a non smoking room isn’t it”, he just shrugged and went on with what he was doing. Of course he had no idea that I am fluent in French.

With our room key in hand we head toward the elevator. In this part of the lobby there is a beauty old fashioned brass elevator, no that was not for us, we headed farther back into the hotel with our bellman. We went up several floors and the bellman opened our door. We walked in and gave him his tip. He went off with our two friends to their room. We walked over to look at the bathroom and noticed that the toilet was running. We giggled the handle but it wouldn’t stop. We grabbed the bellman from the hall to see if he could help. He couldn’t get it to stop either.

He called down to the desk and told them our problem. They told him to take us to another room, which he did. He had a master key so he could get us in. As soon as we entered this room I was hit by the stench of cigarette smoke and also saw the ash tray in the room. Oh no I said we had a non smoking room. He called down to the desk, this really annoyed me because they knew we were non smoking.

Okay they sent us off to a new room. We walked in and put down our suitcase yikes there was already a suitcase in the room, he had just let us into someone else’s room. You guessed it, the bellman called the front desk again and off we went again. This was now room #4.

This room was okay. Not much to look at, colors were garish and didn’t match but the bathroom had been renovated and it was beautiful, it even had a bidet. Okay we were pretty happy now.

Later that evening when I was walking around the room in my stocking feet I found a damp spot on the floor. I figured they must have steam cleaned the carpeting.

We woke up at 7am to an unusual sound. Tap, Tap, Tap it took me a while to figure out where it was coming from. There was

Hotel reviews: Holiday Inn, Aachen, Germany

Aachen is conveniently situated for easy access to other parts of Germany as well as Belgium and the Netherlands. In fact, the city sits at the crossroads of Euroroute 40 which goes from Calais, through Brussels and on to Dresden; and the E25 from Amsterdam, through Strasbourg to Switzerland.

Located on Krefelder Strase, just a few hundred metres off the A4 (E40) motorway, the hotel couldn’t be easier to find.

Krefelder Strase leads directly into the city centre and the Cathedral, City Hall and the quaint old town with it’s narrow little streets are all a just few minutes away from the hotel.

The hotel is housed in a modern building set back some distance from the road so that, although the road is extremely busy with traffic, there are no real problems with noise.

There are 99 bedrooms arranged over 4 floors and all the rooms feature double-size beds. Non-smoking rooms are available, as are rooms suitable for disabled travellers.

The reception area was all very fresh, modern and inviting and, as we were there in December, the large Christmas tree and seasonal displays made for a very pleasant entrance.

As we had reserved this on the net it was a simple matter of handing over our confirmation number. Not that communication would have been a problem anyway, the girl who dealt with us spoke better English than I did.

According to the hotel’s website, their staff speak: Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Polish, Russian, Spanish and Turkish…hopefully not all at the same time!

On checking in, we were given a voucher for a complimentary glass of sherry which we didn’t bother taking advantage of. Sherry?! It was a nice touch though.

Anyway, it was all very friendly and efficient and we were soon on our way to our room.

If you’ve ever stayed in a Holiday Inn, then you’ll know what the room was like – they all seem to be pretty much exactly the same wherever you are. The room was fairly large by European standards with two, good-sized double beds which were comfortable; adequate wardrobe space; a desk; a dresser with plenty of drawers and a table and chairs. The room was well equipped with table lamps and a large window kept it bright during the day.

There was cable TV with the usual selection of channels as well as in-house video and radio. Coffee and tea making facilities were on hand but the sachets of coffee were absolutely revolting – it surely wouldn’t break the bank to supply decent coffee. We also had a trouser press but I’m afraid

Travel destinations: Bruges, Belgium, the Venice of the North

Last year the movie “In Bruges” appeared at American theaters. According to the credits it starred Colin Farrell, Brendan Gleeson and Ralph Fiennes. The actual star of the movie is the city of Bruges itself. Located in the province of West Flanders, north west of Brussels and a brief train ride from the North Sea Coast. On my last trip to Bruges, we arrived by train from Brussels. This was after a flight from Denver. We were fatigued, but determined to use mass transit to reach our destination of Bruges. I had been to Bruges hundreds of times prior to this trip when I had lived in Antwerpen. That was with a different husband. We then had an automobile, his native language was Flemish and he had friends living in the city. Now, close to 20 years later, I was being the tour guide for my “new” husband. Unfortunately, I had forgotten most of the Flemish I had crammed into my English speaking brain so I brought along a pocket size “Dutch” language book. Most Flemish people speak fluent English, so I knew I wouldn’t actually need it. I will try hard during this writing to spell Bruges in the English/French way, although I much prefer to spell cities and towns in the language that is spoken there. That would put Bruges as Brugge.

We arrived at the Brussels airport in the midst of the am rush hour. Customs was a brief experience and before long we began looking for the train station. In just minutes we found the signage and took an escalator down to level one. Within minutes of purchasing our tickets, a train arrived and we took it to Brussels North. It was there we changed trains, finding one going in the direction of Bruges. I had over packed, and being rush hour, the space was limited. Most of the passengers were chattering in French, although Brussels is officially bi-lingual and sits in heart of Flanders. We watched the buildings as we passed by. There were Gothic style churches blocks from new apartment buildings. Soon the urban sprawl was replaced by small farms and straight rows of trees. Shortly after an hour commute we departed the train at the Bruges station.

The elevator down from the platform was kaput, so we navigated the step stairs with our over packed bags. Just outside of the station was the bus depot and ticket kiosk. Taxi’s were lined up awaiting arriving passengers. One could not help but notice the large bicycle parking lot adjacent to the train station. We opted to walk to our hotel. It was just to the west of the station in Sint Michels. Like

The Manchester of France

The city of Lille, which was built on the Deule River, and was first founded in 1066, during the Medieval ages. In the 19th Century, the city Lille became a large industrial city, and the population tripled in a short time.

Lille was taken by the Germans in May 1940, after brief resistance by a Moroccan Infantry division. On September 3rd 1944 the German troops began to leave Lille, fearing the British, who were on their way from Brussels. Following this, the Lille resistance managed to retake part of the city before the British tanks arrived.

Lille was once known as “the Manchester of France” but the old textile mills and dirty heavy industry have now gone, driven out of business in the second half of the 20th century by lower cost foreign producers.

The city is a haven for shoppers. Euralille Avenue Le Courbusier was opened with the channel tunnel in 1994, this impressive business and leisure development houses over 140 shops, hotel and apartments on street level, a Carrefour hypermarket, a roller blading venue in the basement and in one of the tower blocks is Aeronef, music venue and a nightclub.

High-street brands line the pedestrians streets in Central Lille. Sunday is market day. The biggest is at Wazemmes but there’s another one in Old Lille, at the end of the rue de la Monnaie, where the locals say the fruit is better quality.

The city has over 100,000 students to keep the night life vibrant, although one of the nice things about Lille night life is that different age groups mix. Beer is the drink of choice, and almost every beer has a glass to match. The student hang-outs lining the rues Massena and Solferino. If you want a quite night the best night spots are in cosy bars in Vieux Lille.

The Hospice Comtesse Museum is located in the heart of Lille’s old town. Founded in 1237 by Joan of Constantinople, Countess of Flanders for the ailing inhabitants of Lille, the rambling edifice is a maze of rooms where old wards follow on to a chapel and a nunnery.

On the out skirts the Museum of Modern Art houses an extensive and varied collection of 20th-century and modern art originating from various donations, including the Aracine and Masurel collections. The museum has also developed a strong collection of contemporary art focusing on Lyrical Abstraction and Narrative Figuration, with works by Daniel Buren, Martin Barre, Jean-Pierre Bertrand, Gerard Gasiorowski and Claude Rutault. In 1995 the museum received a substantial donation of art brut from L’Aracine.

Different Personalities Of Small Dog Breeds

Once you have decided that you are going to get a small dog, it is time to find out about the different personalities and characteristics of small breeds, so you get one that fits your home and lifestyle.

Brussels Griffon

These adorable little dogs found in two varieties, which are rough and smooth, usually weigh between eight and twelve pounds. They can be a little stubborn when it comes to housebreaking. The smooth Brussels griffon needs brushing once a week and the rough coated Brussels griffon about twice a week. These dogs are great for apartments or small homes as long as you provide them with exercise. In general, this little dog is happy, playful, friendly, but may be a little standoffish with strangers and is better with children that are older. Their average life expectancy is twelve years.

French Bulldogs

French bulldogs are perfect for smaller homes and apartments as long as they can play and romp a little and you do not force them to exercise. They are wonderful, loving, good-natured dogs that love being with the family. They should spend most of their time indoors, especially if it is warm out. The average lifespan of a French bulldog is twelve years.

Australian terriers

These small dogs are extremely energetic and do best in a home with a fenced backyard for lots of exercise. These terriers are great watchdogs that are brave and fearless. They shed very little so brushing them once a week is enough. Australian terriers love being part of the family.

Miniature schnauzer

Twelve to fourteen inches high, these wonderful dogs are salt and pepper, solid black or black and silver colored. They are happy in an apartment or large home in the country, as long as they are with their family. These great companions are intelligent, busy, friendly, and love to play. They require trimming every four to six weeks and brushing occasionally.

Italian greyhound

You need a home with a moderate amount of room to keep this active dog happy. A small dog, usually less than fifteen inches, they come in many different colors. With their very short hair, they appreciate a sweater when going outside in cooler weather. These dogs let you know when a stranger comes in, not aggressive. They are a long-lived breed with their average life span around fourteen years.

Pomeranians

Usually weighing in at a petite six pounds or less, these cute little dogs require a fair amount of grooming and brushing because of their longer hair. Well suited for smaller places, they love being a lap dog and getting lots of attention. Good with children they grew up with, they are playful and very loyal to their owners. Their average lifespan is fifteen years.

Toy Poodle

A toy poodle is perfect for smaller places but is happy wherever their owners are. Weekly brushing and grooming ever four to six weeks will keep them looking their best. Poodles were born to play and should have a supply of their own toys. Extremely intelligent, you can train them easily. Poodles do not like being alone so are a poor choice for anyway that travels or is away a lot. Their average life span is eleven years.

Shopping For Dogs In The Toy Group

The average future dog owner does not own acres of property. They don’t have a fenced backyard or thousand of square feet inside their home. They haven’t thought about their possessions being coated in dog hair or the bags they’ll need to purchase to pick up Fido’s poop. They just see a sweet little face with big paws, and wouldn’t that little diamond-studded collar look so cute on her? Are you an average future dog owner? By selecting a smaller dog, especially one in the Toy dog group designated by the AKC, getting your sweet little puppy will give you less heartache down the road.

There are many advantages to purchasing a smaller dog, or a Toy dog. If you live in an apartment, your little pooch will be able to stretch its legs each day just by running around. When you do take your dog outside to use the bathroom your cleanup will be much easier (if you live in a city that requires you to tidy up and scoop the poop). Being able to control your pup is easier too. Remember how your arm nearly came out of your socket when your German Shepherd saw that squirrel? Never again! You’ll also save money in food cost. You won’t have to purchase dog food in the fifty pound bags and lug them up three flights of stairs to your food-vacuum mutt. And speaking of vacuuming, that’s something you’ll be able to avoid, especially if you choose a shorthaired dog. Some of the Toy dogs have longer hair and require regular grooming. If you plan to breed or show or dress your Toy dog, this will be something you are aware of and are looking forward to.

Disadvantages to owning a toy dog seem to center around the “idea” of them. You want the idea of a big dog for security reasons. And with Toy dogs weighing on average 5 pounds (bitches’ weighing even less) that isn’t mentally reassuring. But these little ankle biters are just as protective as a big hound. In fact, small dogs are downright fearless. Men don’t want to own a Toy dog because small dogs are meant to lie on Grandma’s lap and in the purse of Paris Hilton. This isn’t the case! These miniature tail-waggers have boundless energy in spurts and can bring back a tennis ball with the best of them.

Getting a purebred dog is a fine idea and when you purchase a purebred, you have a good idea of what they’ll look like when fully grown and what to expect from their bloodlines. But rescuing a fleabag stray is a noble thing to do, and whichever pair of eyes and wagging tail you fall in love with is all right. People may consider all small dogs to fall into the “Toy dog” category, but according to the AKC the Toy list is as follows: Affenpinscher, Brussels Griffon, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Chihuahua, Chinese Crested, English Toy Spaniel, Havanese, Italian Greyhound, Japanese Chin, Maltese, Manchester Terrier, Miniature Pinscher, Papillon, Pekingese, Pomeranian, Poodle, Pug, Shih Tzu, Silky Terrier, Tiny Fox Terrier and the Yorkshire Terrier.

There’s More to Do at St Pancras Then Just Board a Train

Saved from demolition in 1960 by the famous English poet Sir John Betjemen, St Pancras International Station was re-opened by Her Majesty the Queen on 6th November 2007 after £800 million restoration programme.

Located in Central London, St Pancras is a stunning and architecturally amazing building that has more underground tunnels than any other London Station. During the six year restoration programme, 150 years of dirt and grime was painstakingly removed from the brickwork, the new roof was fitted with 18,000 panes of self cleaning glass and 20,000 litres Barlow Blue paint, an exact colour match to the original paint work was used on the station’s iron work.

New pieces of artwork were specially commissioned including one of Sir John Betjemen who in addition to saving St Pancras from demolition also helped it achieve Grade I listed status. Another statue, an eight foot high bronze of a couple enjoying a loving embrace is situated underneath the famous St Pancras Clock.

Also saved from demolition in 1960 were The Chambers, a Grade I Gothic Building which fronts St Pancras Station. At a cost of £100 million, the Chambers will be transformed into 67 private apartments and penthouses and a luxury 5 star hotel. Expected to open in 2009 the hotel, to be called the Renaissance St Pancras will be owned and operated by Marriott International and will feature 245 bedrooms, eight meeting rooms, a ballroom as well as health and leisure facilities.

Most notably the new central London home to the Eurostar, providing high speed train links from London to Paris, Brussels and Lille and two other train operators, East Midlands Trains and First Capital Direct, St Pancras is also a great place to meet a friend for a drink, to admire the architecture or to go shopping. Boasting Europe’s long Champagne Bar at 90 metres, it also has 82,0000 square feet of retail space to keep even the most ardent shopper happy for hours.

Source:

BBC

Wikipedia

Delightful Day-Trips To Take On Your Visit To Brussels

Brussels is superbly located for quick-trips to several charming cities in Belgium. The three day-trips in this article have been highlighted because of their proximity to Europes capital.

Antwerp

A little over half an hour by train from the very heart of Brussels is the busy city of Antwerp. If you have a longer stay in Brussels, you’ll want to experience a day here to enjoy it’s interesting fashion shops and nice mix of good value restaurants. If you fancy a stay overnight then the abundance of good, clean hotels will be a welcome sight – particularly as they charge significantly less than you’ll pay in Brussels. You can book a hotel from the tourist office in the town centre of Grote Markt.

The equivalent of Grand Place for Antwerp is it’s pleasant Grote Markt square. Here are some of the must-see sights in Antwerp if you’re only about for a short stay:

- After checking out Grote Markt amble over to the Onze Lieve Vrouwekathedraal – one of the most impressive medieval churches to be found anywhere in Belgium, Onze Lieve Vrouwekathedraal dates back to the 15th century.

- Museum lovers will enjoy Maritime Museum, Rockoxhuis Museum, Momo (a museum dedicated to fashion), Plantin-Moretus Museum and Museum voor Schone Kunsten (art).

- Quite similar to Brussels, there are no shortage of restaurants and cafes in Antwerp – however it is significantly cheaper to eat.

Bruges

Bruges is slightly farther away from Brussels than Antwerp, but still conveniently placed for a day-trip. It takes about an hour to reach Bruges by train and it’s well worth the effort when you consider the beauty this well preserved medieval city has to offer. Because of this, Bruges can often be packed in peak season and it can be difficult to obtain accommodation so be sure to book a place in advance if you plan to spend the night. Being a tourist hotspot, eating out in Bruges can be somewhat more expensive than other places in Belgium, and the food tends to cater to the mass number of tourists that flood the city during peak times.

Once you step into the heart of Bruges, it’s not surprising to know that it’s one of the most visited places in Belgium – there’s wonderful medieval charm here, including ancient building, narrow winding streets and a quaint network of criss-crossing canals.

- Make sure you take a romantic boat ride along the cities beautiful canals. You can get a ticket for under six Euros.

- Bruges has two segments to it’s centre-square – the Markt and the Burg. The latter has some of the most interesting buildings in Bruges including the Heilig Bloed Basiliek, the upper & lower chapel and the Stadhuis (town hall).

- Bruges offers a choice of worthwhile museums such as Groeninge (displaying a fine collection of Flemish art from as early as the 14th century). The Gruuthuse Museum is another that museum lovers will enjoy – set amidst a grand medieval mansion Gruuthuse offers an exquisite collection of art & tapestry.

- St Salvatorskathedraal is a gothic cathedral that dates back to the 13th century.

- Onze Lieve Vrouwekerk took over two hundred years to build and this sprawling church of our lady dates back to the thirteenth century.

- Two of the grandest sights in Bruges are the Stadhuis (possibly the grandest town hall in Belgium, initially built in 1376) and the Belfort (also dating back to the 13th century) which towers over the Markt in the grandest of ways. It is here that the towns charter is kept.

- The Markt is one of the two central squares of Bruges city centre – an open market has been held here as long ago as the tenth century.

- In case you didn’t pick up enough chocolate in Brusses don’t fret – Bruges has more than enough Belgian chocolate shops to keep your cravings satisfied.

Ghent

Ghent is severely under-rated as a tourist spot. With it’s quaint town centre comprising narrow canals, cobbled traffic-free streets & a fine castle and cathedral it’s a very alluring place to plan a day-trip to. It’s also just a half hour train ride from Brussels.

Here are the must-see sights in Ghent if you happen to come for a short stay:

- The fabric of Ghents town centre was built in the 13th and 14th century. Like Brussels It’s easy to navigate through Ghent thanks to a comprehensive and well run public transport system. Your first port of call should be to the impressive Stadhius (the largest town hall in Belgium) which dates back to the early 15th century. Close-by, the Belfort was built in the 14th century and offers stunning vistas over the city.

- It took approximately six hudred years to complete St Baafskathedraal – Ghents most prolific and oldest Cathedral and some parts of this gothic masterpiece stretch back to the twelfth century.

- Ghent has some stunning listed buildings (many of which are a thousand years old) and you can see many of them in and around the area that runs from St Michielsbrug to St Baafskathedral.

- Gravensteen Castle was constructed in the eleventh century and it’s one of the most prolific landmarks of Ghent. Closeby are the Museum voor Sierkunst en Vormgeving (with various displays depicting Ghent life over the past couple of centuries) and the fish market (Vishmarkt). There are alternative museums to visit – Museum voor Schone Kunsten has a large display of art dating back to the 14th century while the Bijlolemuseum is held in a building that was first built in the 13th century.

- Pop in to Vrijdagmarkt, a pleasant market & restaurant area peppered with market stalls and quaint cafes/bars.

- Stroll along the river Leie for one of the most pleasant walks available anywhere in Belgium.

- Ghent has a large selection of restaurants, cafes and bars and they range from pokey student type affairs to more elegant and expensive offerings. The south of the city is known for its student population so you’re more likely to find a youthful crowd here. There’s a reasonably wide selection of choices throughout the city – from traditional Belgian fare to Thai, Italian and Asian.

- If you’re planning on staying the night you should be able to find a room that meets your requirements. Accommodation is typically fairly easy to secure (except for July when the town hosts Gentse Feesten). It’s possible to secure a basic room from as little as 25 euros – or if you’re able to afford something more extravagant you could kip in style for 400 euros.

If your stay in Brussels extends to a week or more, you should certainly consider a day-trip to at least one of these wonderful Belgian cities.