Can Yahoos search technology catch up with Googles?

The question is becoming increasingly irrelevant. Google, Yahoo! and Microsoft are in the news right now, Redmond having dropped $40B in market cap in response to their bid to buy up the Yahooligans for another $45B in order to produce a “credible number two” to Google’s far-and-away number one in the online advertising space.

They’re all fighting to be the best buggywhip manufacturer in town, particularly when it comes to the mobile space.

Horizontal search, which Google unquestionably excels at, has its uses, but those uses become more and more limited as information (much of it useless) becomes increasingly “available” (i.e. findable). Simply finding a chunk of information that matches your inevitably incomplete attempts at what you think it might look like isn’t usually enough, not when the matching process is driven by how many randomly-chosen others point at this chunk, without regard to who’s looking for it.

A couple of concrete examples: if you just know me by first and last name, you’ll have one hell of a time finding anything that’s actually about me with Googlethere’s a guy who’s worked for Reuters for years with exactly the same name, who gets pointed at a lot more than I do (I’m working on this, I assure you). Most of what you’ll turn up is about him, unless you know more about me than that.

I live in Santa Cruz. Santa Cruz, California. When I try to find out something about Santa Cruz,I frequently find myself wading through a stuff about Santa Cruz County, Arizona, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia, Santa Cruz de Tenerife in the Canary Islands, Santa Cruz Island (aka Indefatigable Island) in the Galapagos archipelago, and so on. These are all places, whichwhile I’m sure they’re quite interesting, kindaare not locales that I’m likely to be looking for information about. Because I’m me, but Google doesn’t really know that (although they have enough information to know it better than they do).

I travel a lot. Type “plane flight to Brussels” into Google, and you’ll certainly turn up pointers to places that could get you one. Quite a few of them, in fact, both of the “sponsored” (i.e. AdWords ads) as well as of the “organic” (i.e. directly generated by the search) variety. Now, your work really starts. Out of the, oh, three-quarters of a million responses there, which one gets you the cheapest ticket on the nicest airline leaving (or arriving) at the time you want, and so on…?

Thus, the limitations of the horizontal approach to both

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